How to Check Where is my Refund from IRS

By | February 1, 2019
(Last Updated On: February 22, 2019)

Check Where’s My Refund from IRS?

Where’s My Refund? (Click here) will give you the status of your refund. You can check the status within 24 hours after we’ve received your e-file return or 4 weeks after you’ve mailed a paper return. It has the most up to date information about your refund.

Telephone Access

If you don’t have Internet access, you may call the refund hotline at 800-829-1954, or call 866-464-2050 if checking on your amended return refund.

Check Where’s My Refund on Mobile ?

Download the IRS2Go app Click here to check your refund status.

Check Where’s My Refund Online ?

You needs to enter your

  • Social Security Number,
  • your Filing Status and
  • the refund amount as shown on your tax return.

Click here to Check Refund Status online.

What You Will Need to Check Refund from IRS

  •  Social security number or
  • ITIN Your filing status
  • Your exact refund amount
  •  24 hours after e-filing
  • 4 weeks after you mailed your return
  • Updates are made daily, usually overnight

When is Where’s My Refund Available?

Where’s My Refund? is available almost all of the time. However, IRS system is not available every Monday, early, from 12:00 am (Midnight) to 3:00 am Eastern Time.

IRS Refund Trace feature is not available during the following times (Eastern Time):

  • Sunday: 12:00 am (Midnight) to 7:00 pm
  • Monday: 12:00 am (Midnight) to 6:00 am
  • Tuesday: 3:30 am to 6:00 am
  • Wednesday: 3:30 am to 6:00 am
  • Thursday: 3:30 am to 6:00 am
  • Friday: 3:30 am to 6:00 am
  • Saturday: 3:30 am to 6:00 am and 9:00 pm to Midnight

Also, occasionally our system may be unavailable on Sundays between 1:00 am and 7:00 am Eastern Time.

Refund Timing for Earned Income Tax Credit and Additional Child Tax Credit Filers

Taxpayers who claim the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Additional Child Tax Credit may experience a refund hold. According to the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act, the IRS cannot issue these refunds before mid-February. The IRS expects the earliest EITC/ACTC related refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or debit cards starting February 27, 2019, if these taxpayers chose direct deposit and there are no other issues with their tax return.

Where’s My Refund? Click here e ‎on IRS.gov and the IRS2Go mobile app will be updated February 23 for the vast majority of early filers who claimed the Earned Income Tax Credit or the Additional Child Tax Credit. These taxpayers will not see a refund date on Where’s My Refund? or through their software packages until then. The IRS, tax preparers and tax software will not have additional information on refund dates, so Where’s My Refund? remains the best way to check the status of a refund. Where’s My Refund? is only updated once daily, usually overnight, so checking it more often will not produce new or different results.

Why IRS Refund is delayed ?

Some common issues which may extend processing times:

  • Refunds from amended returns are generally issued within 16 weeks.
  • If you filed an injured spouse claim, refer to Topic No. 203 for more information.
  • For refund claims with an application for an individual taxpayer identification number (ITIN) attached, refer to Topic No. 857 for more information.
  • If you requested a refund of tax withheld on a Form 1042-S.pdf by filing a Form 1040NR.pdf, allow up to 6 months from the original due date of the 1040NR return or the date you filed the 1040NR, whichever is later, to receive any refund due.
  • By law, the IRS cannot issue refunds before mid-February for tax returns that claim the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC). While the IRS will process your return when it is received, it cannot issue related refunds before mid-February. The IRS expects the earliest EITC/ACTC related refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or on debit cards starting on Feb. 27, 2019, if they chose direct deposit and there are no other issues with the tax return.

You can also refer to Topic No. 303 for a checklist of common errors made when preparing your tax return and for additional items that may delay the processing of your return.

IRS Refund Type

Join the eight in 10 taxpayers who get their refunds faster by using e-file and direct deposit. You have several options for receiving your federal individual income tax refund:

  • Direct Deposit: The fastest way is by direct deposit into your checking or savings account, including an individual retirement arrangement (IRA). See the Form 1040 General Instructions for more information. In an effort to combat fraud and identity theft, the IRS limits the number of direct deposits into a single financial account or prepaid debit card to three refunds per year. Taxpayers who exceed this limit will receive a notice and a refund check instead, which may take up to 10 weeks;
  • TreasuryDirect®: Deposit into a TreasuryDirect® online account to buy U.S. Treasury marketable securities and savings bonds. For more information, see Using Your Tax Refund for TreasuryDirect;
  • Traditional, Roth, or SEP-IRA: Directly deposit part or all of your refund into a traditional IRA, Roth IRA, or SEP-IRA, but not a SIMPLE IRA. You must have an existing IRA account before you file your return, and your routing number and account number. See the Form 1040 General Instructions for more information. For more information on IRA contributions, see Publication 590-A.pdfContributions to Individual Retirement Arrangements (IRAs);
  • Savings Bonds: By purchase of U.S. Series I Savings Bonds up to $5,000;
  • A Health Savings Account (HSA);
  • An Archer MSA;
  • A Coverdell Education Savings Account (ESA); or
  • Paper Check: By paper check sent to the address listed on your return.

Splitting Your Refund

If you choose to receive your refund by direct deposit, you can split your refund into as many as three separate accounts. For example, you can request that we directly deposit into a checking, a savings, and a retirement account by completing Form 8888.pdfAllocation of Refund (Including Savings Bond Purchases) and attaching it to your income tax return. You can also use Form 8888 to buy up to $5000 in paper or electronic series I savings bonds. You can’t have your refund deposited into more than one account or buy paper series I savings bonds if you file Form 8379.pdfInjured Spouse Allocation. As a reminder, your refund should only be directly deposited into accounts that are in your own name, your spouse’s name, or both if it’s a joint account. Your refund should not be direct deposited into an account in your return preparer’s name. Please note, to receive your refund by direct deposit (whether into one account or more), the total refund amount must be $1.00 or more.

Online or Mobile Device

Where’s My Refund? Click here has the most up to date information available about your refund. Use it to get your personalized refund status. The tool is updated once a day so you don’t need to check more often. You can also download our free mobile app, IRS2Go, from an iPhone or Android device to check Where’s My Refund?

Checking Your Refund Status

You can start checking on the status of your refund within 24 hours after IRS’ve received your e-filed return or 4 weeks after you’ve mailed a paper return. Have your 2018 tax return handy so you can provide your taxpayer identification number, your filing status, and the exact whole dollar amount of your refund shown on your return.

General Information

Where’s My Refund? shows information for the most recent tax year filed in the current year.

For U.S. individual income tax returns filed on or after July 1, refund information will remain available throughout the following year until you file a tax return for a more current tax year. If a more recent tax year has been processed, you won’t be able to see information about a previous tax year on Where’s My Refund?

The Where’s My Refund? tool includes a tracker that displays progress through 3 stages: (1) Return Received, (2) Refund Approved, and (3) Refund Sent. Where’s My Refund?provides a personalized refund date as soon as the IRS processes your tax return and approves your refund. It doesn’t show information about amended returns. To check the status of an amended return, use Where’s My Amended Return? Click here

Where’s My Refund? has the most accurate and complete information available. IRS representatives don’t have information beyond what’s shown on Where’s My Refund? so you don’t need to call the IRS unless the tool tells you to call. Updates to refund status are made no more than once a day – usually at night.

Not Entitled to Refund Received

If you receive a refund to which you’re not entitled, or for an amount that’s more than you expected, don’t cash the check until you receive a notice that explains the difference; then follow the instructions on the notice. For a direct deposit that was greater than expected, review the notice to determine if the difference was correct, and follow the instructions on the notice. For information about returning an erroneous refund, see Topic No. 161.

Refund Less than Expected

If you receive a refund for a smaller amount than you expected, you may cash the check. If it’s determined that you should have received more, you will later receive a check for the difference. You’ll also get a notice explaining the difference. Follow the instructions on the notice.

Missing Refund Check

If your refund check is lost, stolen or destroyed, the IRS will initiate a refund trace to determine the status of the refund. To See I lost my refund check. How do I get a new one? Click here

Should You Call the IRS for Refund?

The IRS issues most refunds in less than 21 days, although some require additional time. You should only call if it has been:

  • 21 days or more since you e-filed
  • 6 weeks or more since you mailed your return, or when
  • “Where’s My Refund” tells you to contact the IRS

According to the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act, the IRS cannot issue EITC and ACTC refunds before February 15. The IRS expects the earliest EITC/ACTC related refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or debit cards on February 27, 2019, if these taxpayers chose direct deposit and there are no other issues with their tax return.

Do a 2019 Paycheck Checkup and adjust your withholding with your employer now to make sure your withholding is right for next year.

IRS Refund FAQs

Why is my refund being held?

If you claim the EITC or ACTC on your tax return, the IRS cannot issue your refund before mid-February. The law requires the IRS to hold the entire refund — even the portion not associated with the EITC or ACTC. Like previous years, some tax refunds may be held if there are questions about the tax return or the IRS needs more information.

When will I get my refund?

The IRS expects the earliest EITC/ACTC related refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or debit cards starting February 27, 2019, if these taxpayers chose direct deposit and there are no other issues with their tax return.

Why does it take so long for the funds to show up in my account?

It takes additional time for refunds to be processed after leaving the IRS, and for financial institutions to accept and deposit them to bank accounts and products like debit cards. Also, many financial institutions do not process payments on weekends or holidays, which can affect when refunds reach taxpayers. For EITC and ACTC filers, the three-day holiday weekend involving President’s Day affects their refund timing.

How quickly will I get my refund?

We issue most refunds in less than 21 calendar days.

I’m counting on my refund for something important. Can I expect to receive it in 21 days?


Many different factors can affect the timing of your refund after we receive your return. Even though we issue most refunds in less than 21 days, it’s possible your refund may take longer. Also, remember to take into consideration the time it takes for your financial institution to post the refund to your account or for you to receive it by mail.

It’s been longer than 21 days since the IRS received my return and I haven’t gotten my refund. Why?

Some tax returns take longer to process than others for many reasons, including when a return:

  • Includes errors
  • Is incomplete
  • Is affected by identity theft or fraud
  • Includes a claim filed for an Earned Income Tax Credit or an Additional Child Tax Credit. See Q&A below.
  • Includes a Form 8379, Injured Spouse Allocation, which could take up to 14 weeks to process
  • Needs further review in general

We will contact you by mail when we need more information to process your return.

I claimed the Earned Income Tax Credit (EITC) or the Additional Child Tax Credit (ACTC) on my tax return. When can I expect my refund?


According to the Protecting Americans from Tax Hikes (PATH) Act, the IRS cannot issue EITC and ACTC refunds before mid-February. The IRS expects the earliest EITC/ACTC related refunds to be available in taxpayer bank accounts or debit cards starting Feb. 27, 2019, if these taxpayers chose direct deposit and there are no other issues with their tax return.

Where’s My Refund? Click here on IRS.gov and the IRS2Go mobile app remains the best way to check the status of a refund. Where’s My Refund? will be updated with projected deposit dates for most early EITC and ACTC refund filers on February 23. These taxpayers will not see a refund date on Where’s My Refund? ‎or through their software packages until then. The IRS, tax preparers and tax software will not have additional information on refund dates, so these taxpayers should not contact or call them about refunds before the end of February.

Will calling you help me get my refund any faster?

No. Our phone and walk-in representatives can only research the status of your refund 21 days after you filed electronically; 6 weeks after you mailed your paper return; or if Where’s My Refund? click here directs you to contact IRS.

What information does Where’s My Refund? have?

It has information on the most recent tax year refund we have on file for you.

When can I start checking Where’s My Refund? for my refund’s status?

24 hours after we’ve received your electronically filed tax return or 4 weeks after you’ve mailed a paper tax return.

Will Where’s My Refund? show me when I’ll receive my refund?

Where’s My Refund? will give you a personalized date after we process your return and approve your refund.

Will ordering a transcript help me find out when I’ll get my refund?
A tax transcript will not help you find out when you’ll get your refund. The information transcripts have about your account does not necessarily reflect the amount or timing of your refund. They are best used to validate past income and tax filing status for mortgage, student and small business loan applications, and to help with tax preparation.

I’m a nonresident alien. I don’t have to pay U.S. federal income tax. How do I claim a refund for federal taxes withheld on income from a U.S. source? When can I expect to receive my refund?

To claim a refund of federal taxes withheld on income from a U.S. source, a nonresident alien must report the appropriate income and withholding amounts on Form 1040NR U.S. Nonresident Alien Income Tax Return. You must include the documents substantiating any income and withholding amounts when you file your Form 1040NR. We need more than 21 days to process a 1040NR return. Please allow up to 6 months from the date you filed the 1040NR for your refund.

How will I know you’re processing my tax return?

Where’s My Refund? follows your tax return from receipt to completion. It will tell you when your return is in received status and if your refund is in approved or sent status.

Where’s My Refund? follows your tax return from receipt to completion. It will tell you when your return is in received status and if your refund is in approved or sent status.

What is happening when Where’s My Refund? shows my tax return status as received?

IRS have your tax return and is processing it.

What is happening when Where’s My Refund? shows my refund’s status as approved?

IRS’ve approved your refund. We are preparing to send your refund to your bank or directly to you in the mail. This status will tell you when we will send the refund to your bank (if you selected the direct deposit option). Please wait 5 days after we’ve sent the refund to check with your bank about your refund, since banks vary in how and when they credit funds. (It could take several weeks before you receive a mailed refund check.)

How long will it take for my status to change from return received to refund approved?
Sometimes a few days, but it could take longer.

Does Where’s My Refund? always display my refund status showing the different stages of return received, refund approved and refund sent?
No, not always. Sometimes, when we are still reviewing your return, instead, it will display instructions or an explanation of what IRS is doing.

Does Where’s My Refund? update often?
Once per day, usually at night. There’s no need to check more often.

Will Where’s My Refund? give me my amended return’s status?

No, it won’t give you information about amended tax returnsWhere’s My Amended Return? can give you the status of your amended return. (Our phone and walk-in representatives can only research the status of your amended return 16 weeks or more after you’ve mailed it.)

I requested a direct deposit refund. Why are you mailing it to me as a paper check?

There are three possible reasons. They are as follows:

  • We can only deposit refunds electronically into accounts in your own name, your spouse’s name or in a joint account.
  • A financial institution may reject a direct deposit.
  • We can’t deposit more than three electronic refunds into a single financial account.

Why is my refund different than the amount on the tax return I filed?

All or part of your refund may have been used (offset) to pay off past-due federal tax, state income tax, state unemployment compensation debts, child support, spousal support, or other federal nontax debts, such as student loans. To find out if you may have an offset or if you have questions about an offset, contact the agency to which you owe the debt.

We also may have changed your refund amount because we made changes to your tax return. You’ll get a notice explaining the changes. Where’s My Refund? will reflect the reasons for the refund offset when it relates to a change in your tax return.

Tax Topic 203 – Refund Offsets for Unpaid Child Support, Certain Federal and State Debts, and Unemployment Compensation Debts (click here) has more information about refund offsets.

What should I do when the refund I receive is not from my tax account?
Please don’t cash the refund check or spend the direct deposit refund. Send the refund back to us. Tax Topic 161 – Returning an Erroneous Refund – Paper Check or Direct Deposit(Click here) has more information on what to do.

 Can I receive a tax refund if I am currently making payments under an installment agreement or payment plan for another federal tax period?

Can I receive a tax refund if I am currently making payments under an installment agreement or payment plan for another federal tax period?

Answer:

No, one of the conditions of your installment agreement is that the IRS will automatically apply any refund due to you against taxes you owe. Because your refund isn’t applied toward your regular monthly payment, continue making your installment agreement payments as scheduled.

If your refund exceeds your total balance due on all outstanding liabilities including accruals, and you don’t owe certain past-due amounts, such as federal tax, state tax, a student loan, or child support, you’ll receive a refund of the amount over and above what you owe. For more information on these non-IRS refund offsets, you can call the Bureau of the Fiscal Service (BFS) at 800-304-3107 (toll-free).

Additional Information:

I lost my refund check. How do I get a new one?

Answer:

If you lost your refund check, you should initiate a refund trace:

  • Call us at 800-829-1954 (toll-free) and either use the automated system or speak with an agent.
  • However, if you filed a married filing jointly return, you can’t initiate a trace using the automated systems. Download and complete the Form 3911, Taxpayer Statement Regarding Refund (PDF) or the IRS can issue you a Form 3911 to get the replacement process started.

Your claim for a missing refund is processed one of two ways:

  • If the check wasn’t cashed, you’ll receive a replacement check once the original check is canceled.
  • If the refund check was cashed, the Bureau of the Fiscal Service (BFS) will provide you with a claim package that includes a copy of the cashed check. Follow the instructions for completing the claim package. BFS will review your claim and the signature on the canceled check before determining whether they can issue you a replacement check. The BFS review can take up to six weeks to complete.

Is it possible to find out if my federal tax refund check was cashed?

Answer:

Yes, if you need to know whether your federal tax refund check was cashed, you can initiate a refund trace by using one of the following methods:

  • Call us at 800-829-1954 (toll-free) and either use the automated system or speak with a representative.
  • If you filed a married filing jointly return, you can’t initiate a trace using the automated systems. The IRS will issue you a Form 3911, Taxpayer Statement Regarding Refund (PDF) to get the process started or you can download the form.

If you’re trying to obtain a photocopy of your refund check because of a dispute over the proceeds, call us at 800-829-1954and speak to a representative  to request assistance.

By law, the IRS can’t disclose any information to you about someone else’s refund. For example, the IRS can’t discuss a check issued to another taxpayer with you.

If you lost your refund check, see I lost my refund check. How do I get a new one?

What is a split refund?

Answer:

A split refund lets you divide your refund, in any proportion you want, and direct deposit the funds into up to three different accounts with U.S. financial institutions. Use Form 8888, Allocation of Refund (Including Savings Bond Purchases)to request to have your refund split or to use part or all of your refund to buy up to $5,000 in paper or electronic U.S. Series I Savings Bonds for yourself or someone else.

Additional Information:

If I am filing a joint return with my spouse, must our refund be deposited to a jointly-held account?

Answer:

You can ask the IRS to direct deposit a refund from a jointly-filed return into your account, your spouse’s account, or a joint account. However, because state and financial institution rules can vary, you should first verify that your financial institution accepts a joint refund deposit into an individual account.

May I direct part or all of my refund to apply as a contribution for the prior year to my individual retirement account (IRA) on Form 8888?

Answer:

Yes, but the refund must be deposited by the due date for filing your tax return (not counting extensions). In addition, IRS direct deposits of federal tax refunds won’t indicate which year the IRA contribution is for. If you want all your refund deposited into your IRA, you don’t use Form 8888, Allocation of Refund (Including Savings Bond Purchases); you do it on your tax return.

  • Ensure that your financial institution accepts deposits for the prior year to IRAs.
  • As with all IRA deposits, the account owner is responsible for informing the IRA trustee of the year for which the deposit is intended, for ensuring that contributions don’t exceed annual contribution limitations and that contributions are timely made.

If you fail to notify the IRA trustee of the intended year for the deposit, the IRA trustee can assume the deposit is for the current year (for example, a refund received in 2019 is deposited as a contribution for 2019 and not for 2018).

The IRS isn’t responsible for the timeliness or contribution amounts related to an IRA direct deposit.

  • An error on your return or an offset of your refund could change the amount of refund available for deposit (for more information, see Are there conditions that could change the amount of my direct deposits?).
  • You must verify the deposit amount and that the deposit was actually made to the account on time — by the due date of the return (without regard to extensions).
  • If the deposit into your account doesn’t occur by the due date of the return (without regard to extensions), the deposit is a contribution for 2019 rather than 2018, and you must file an amended 2018 return to reduce any IRA deduction and any retirement savings contributions credit you claimed for 2018 for that deposit.

Are there conditions that could change the amount of my refund?

Answer:

Yes, there are several factors that could change the amount of your tax refund – resulting in either a larger or smaller refund than expected.

Examples that could increase your refund are math errors and other mistakes on your return.

Examples that could decrease your refund include:

  • Math errors or mistakes;
  • Delinquent federal taxes;
  • State taxes, child support, student loans or other delinquent federal nontax obligations; and
  • When the IRS withholds a portion of your refund while further review of an item claimed on your return takes place.

What should I do if I entered an incorrect routing or account number for direct deposit of my refund?

Answer:

The IRS assumes no responsibility for tax preparer or taxpayer error. Please verify your account and routing numbers with your financial institution and double check the accuracy of the numbers you enter on your return prior to signing and submitting it. You should not request a deposit of your refund into an account that’s not in your own name.

The IRS handles account or routing number errors the same for both split refunds and regular direct deposits.

Scenario:

  • You omit a digit in the account or routing number of an account and the number doesn’t pass the IRS’s validation check. In this case, the IRS will send you a paper check for the entire refund instead of a direct deposit.
  • You incorrectly enter an account or routing number and the number passes the validation check but your designated financial institution rejects and returns the deposit to the IRS. The IRS will issue a paper check for that portion of your refund once received.
  • You incorrectly enter an account or routing number that belongs to someone else and your designated financial institution accepts the deposit. You must work directly with the respective financial institution to recover your funds. See the last solution bullet below.
  • You requested a Refund Anticipation Loan (RAL) or Refund Anticipation Check (RAC) through your preparer or preparation software. Usually this occurs when you authorize the fee for preparation to be taken from your refund. Even if you didn’t request a direct deposit, these types of refunds are directly deposited into the preparer’s financial institution so you should contact that institution for resolution. See the last solution bullet below.

Solution:

  • If the return hasn’t already posted to our system, you can ask us to stop the direct deposit. You may call us toll-free at 800-829-1040, M – F, 7 a.m. – 7 p.m.
  • Generally, if the financial institution recovers the funds and returns them to the IRS, the IRS will send a paper refund check to your last known address on file with the IRS.
  • If you have contacted the financial institution and two weeks have passed with no results, you will need to file Form 3911, Taxpayer Statement Regarding Refund to initiate a trace. This allows the IRS to contact the bank on your behalf to attempt recovery of your refund. Banks are allowed up to 90 days from the date of the initial trace input to respond to our request for information.
  • If funds aren’t available or the bank refuses to return the funds, the IRS cannot compel the bank to do so. The case may then become a civil matter between you and the financial institution and/or the owner of the account into which the funds were deposited.

How can I ensure my refund is deposited as I designate?

Answer:

  • First, check with your financial institution to ensure they will accept a direct deposit for the type of account you’re designating. Some financial institutions will accept direct deposits for some types of accounts, but not others.
  • Second, make sure you use the correct routing and account numbers for the account – ask your financial institution if you’re unsure – and double check the accuracy of the numbers you enter on your tax return. An incorrect or transposed number could result in your financial institution rejecting the deposit or, worse, depositing your refund into someone else’s account.
  • Third, double check your return to ensure you haven’t made math or other errors that could increase or decrease the actual amount of your refund. The IRS recommends electronic filing for the most error-free return.

Note: Your refund should only be deposited directly into accounts that are in your own name, your spouse’s name, or both if it’s a joint account. Also, no more than three electronic refunds can be directly deposited into a single financial account or prepaid debit card. Taxpayers who exceed the limit will receive an IRS notice and a paper refund.

What if I entered the correct account and routing numbers, but the IRS made an error in depositing my refund?

Answer:

Contact an IRS customer service representative to correct any agency errors by calling 800-829-1040. Customer service representatives are available Monday through Friday, 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. local time, unless otherwise noted (see telephone assistance for more information). Unfortunately, this may result in you receiving a paper check.

How can I collect child support from the noncustodial parent?

Answer:

If you need assistance in obtaining child support payments that are overdue, you must contact the Office of Child Support Enforcement.

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